ALEX BOUGHT AN ARMY TRUCK: Episode 3

I knew that after getting Welly back to the shop that I wasn’t going to be able to throw much money at him. Having just dropped almost $17k on the truck I was a little short on spare change so if I were to do anything on the truck it would have to be pretty inexpensive/ free. Well, luckily for me, I have a lot of left over materials from previous projects and plenty of time to figure out how the heck to put those materials to good use. I had intended to start work on the cab interior first since it didn’t require buying engine parts or building an enclosure to get started, so that’s what I did…

Wellington (1 of 53).jpg

With that decided I tore into the interior and stripped everything out. The interior was fairly clean inside and I was happy to see that there was little to no rust on the floor. My first objective in the cab refit was to sound deaden. I had a couple packs of Noico 80mil sound deadening which I laid down over the dog house in the cab, then proceeded to do the doors, back wall and ceiling. I then stuffed as much industrial glass wool insulation into the walls as I could which should help with the noise and retaining heat. The ceiling received a layer of Kilmat 50mil sound deadening and then egg carton foam insulation, in addition to that I filled all the open ceiling cavities with expanding foam. Overall the sound deadening phase went quick and painless. It was immediately noticeable when driving across the yard to the wood shop that my efforts were not in vain.

80mil Noico sound deadening over the dog house.

80mil Noico sound deadening over the dog house.

Wellington (3 of 53).jpg
Willow just loves watching me busy myself over our new big and green home.

Willow just loves watching me busy myself over our new big and green home.

Kilmat 50mil sound deadening on the back wall and ceiling.

Kilmat 50mil sound deadening on the back wall and ceiling.

Next was eggshell foam and expanding foam for the ceiling.

Next was eggshell foam and expanding foam for the ceiling.

Shortly after finishing the sound deadening it was time to get into the wood work. I started with the back wall panel then moved to the ceiling panel and used 1/2 ply as they’d be “structural’, meaning I’d be hanging shelves from them. The back wall and ceiling panels were skinned in old burlap sacks that I found in a barn, I want to reuse as much old materials as possible to accomplish a slightly kitschy slightly cabinesque feel. Next I cut wall panels out of 1/4 fur ply, stained then varnished them. After all panels came the shelves and head unit. The head unit was a bit of a challenge because it had to be sculpted to the ceiling and was really not easy to hold up while taking measurements and fitting. Once I had finished the head unit and shelving I built behind seating storage/ dog platform. The carpet came from a previous project and hinges off an old barn.

Set up in the “wood shop”.

Set up in the “wood shop”.

Before

Before

After

After

Before

Before

After

After

First edition of the head unit.

First edition of the head unit.

Second version of the head unit.

Second version of the head unit.

Disregard the switch labels, they’ll be changed to controls for the stereo, interior lights and exterior door lights.

Disregard the switch labels, they’ll be changed to controls for the stereo, interior lights and exterior door lights.

The back storage area/ dog platform.  This is a very tight fit and has a very specific method to going for into the cab.

The back storage area/ dog platform. This is a very tight fit and has a very specific method to going for into the cab.

Carpet covered lids and white cupboard interiors.  I find that it’s way easier to see stuff inside the cubby’s when they’re painted white inside.

Carpet covered lids and white cupboard interiors. I find that it’s way easier to see stuff inside the cubby’s when they’re painted white inside.

Wellington (26 of 53).jpg

Overall I’m quite happy with how the interior wood work has come out, it looks cozy inside without any of the added knick knacks that come with people inhabiting an area. As soon as I’ve purchased material and have space I’ll be moving the truck over to the other shop to start a rebuild on the front bumper. Once that’s done it’ll be time to start stripping down the exterior to get at the motor and transmission and that’s when the difficult part starts…

Wellington (40 of 53).jpg
Note the drivers arm rest/ storage unit.

Note the drivers arm rest/ storage unit.

Willow hasn’t realized she has a new spot, she still thinks the floor is where she’s allowed…

Willow hasn’t realized she has a new spot, she still thinks the floor is where she’s allowed…

Wellington (39 of 53).jpg
Wellington (47 of 53).jpg

I’ve also started designing the living area. There is a lot of research and time that goes into building a living enclosure that won’t break the bank but will also be strong enough to stand up to the twisting and torquing of the truck, be able to keep me warm during cold weather and cool during hot, and have a place for all the various amenities that I intend to install inside. Thus far it seems like having a 2”x2”’1/16” steel frame with a aluminum skin VHB bonded to the frame is my best option to create what I want. The overall length of the living area will be 16ft and 8ft wide. There will be a kitchen, sitting area, bathroom, wood stove and 6.5ftx5ft bed with a bike garage underneath.

Wellington (51 of 53).jpg
Wellington (53 of 53).jpg